Tookii things to do with kids cactus

Explain this to me?

This blog has absolutely nothing to do with ‘things to do with kids’ unless of course they either have the same question as I do about today’s topic or have come into contact with today’s subject matter.

Yes folks, something is bothering me today and I wonder if your adult expertise can clear up a question that has been nagging me?Β I have blogged about gardens many times and always in a positive light but today is just a simple question.

… Cactus ….

Tookii things to do with kids why cactus
The Evil Cactus

… WHY?

Seriously WHAT purpose do these prickly, savage beasts of spines and sludge serve in the garden? Are they designed as a defence system to protect a garden from otherwise innocent children who just want to enjoy the sunshine.

… Cactus … why do I need you in my life? … why? … why? … why?


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11 thoughts on “Explain this to me?

  1. I truly don’t know what to say about cactus plants, in terms of serving any useful purpose…but it is impressive that they can go incredibly long stretches without water by storing water in their roots and saving it for a (non) rainy day. πŸ˜€

    Oh, and they’re prickly because it helps defend them against predators. On the bright side, they are the perfect plants for people who’ve managed to kill every other plant they’ve ever gotten within ten feet of. πŸ˜›

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Tookii,don’t knock the cactus down. It serves a purpose in this Earth. If you were stranded in the desert and need water, the cactus is Mother Nature’s water keg. It’s the easiest houseplant to take care of. it’s pest-free. The thick stems store water and since it doesn’t have any leaves, it helps lessen water loss while its waxy coating holds water.The spines help fight off thirsty predators. Think of the porcupine’s spines as a comparison. It has nice blossoms in some cactus varieties. cactus can be used as food. The pulp can be pickled, The flat pads of the cactus are cooked and eaten as a vegetable(after the spines are rubbed off of course).There’s a type of cactus that’s classified as a fruit—-dragon fruit. To take care of the cactus, add extra sand to the potty mix which helps give good drainage. Water the cactus once or twice a week. Do not overwater.
    Do not judge a book by its cover. Same with the cactus.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. So you’re telling me that it is useful if I was stranded in a desert. It would have stuff that I could drink and eat to keep me alive yet would sit there taunting me with it’s impenetrable prickly armour? Oh the cruel irony haha πŸ˜‰

      Liked by 1 person

      1. LOL. Sometimes, the ugly ones especially the “frogs” are the mosr useful. Also try the fruit –durian which you can get at an Asian market. Smells like hell(rotten egg smell) but once you eat the pulp(like a custard), it tastes like heaven. To wash off the awful smell from your hands, use the shell of the fruit by filling it with water and washing your hands on it like a little basin. Mothe Nature thinks of everything.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh cool I’m really just picking on the cactus for fun because it pricked me in the garden haha and from what people are telling me in the other comments, cactus are sadistic meanies with a twisted sense of humor haha πŸ˜‰

      Liked by 1 person

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